presents
Voter's Edge California Voter Guide
Conozca la información antes de votar.
Presentado por
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
March 3, 2020 — Primary Election
Distrito especial

Jurupa Unified School District
Measure E Bond Measure - 55% Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

No se aprueba

7,110 votos si (46%)

8,332 votos no (54%)

100% de distritos activos (29/29).

16,066 boletas electorales serán contadas.

To repair deteriorating roofs/plumbing/electrical systems; update classrooms/labs/facilities/technology to support college readiness/career preparation in math, science, engineering, technology, arts/skilled trades; upgrade older schools to meet the same academic/safety standards as newer schools, and improve student safety; shall the Jurupa Unified School District measure authorizing $192,000,000 in bonds at legal rates be adopted, levying 4¢ per $100 assessed value ($10,800,000 annually) while bonds are outstanding, with citizen oversight, independent audits, local control?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Análisis del analista legislativo / Proposal

https://www.voteinfo.net/

The Board of Education (“Board”) of the Jurupa Unified School District (“District”) by adopting Resolution No. 2020/17 (“Resolution”), elected to call an election pursuant to Section 18 of Article XVI and Section 1 of Article XIIIA of the California Constitution and Section 15100 and 15264 et seq. of the California Education Code to obtain authorization to issue and sell general obligation Bonds (“Bonds”) in the aggregate amount principal amount of one hundred ninety-two million dollars ($192,000,000).

This Measure was placed on the ballot by the Board of the District.

The Bonds would be used by the District to renovate, upgrade, repair and construct buildings, classrooms, school labs, libraries and learning centers. The Bonds may be used for school facilities projects such as modernizing classrooms, labs and career -training facilities and providing upgraded technology, security and safety measures. The Bonds would not be used to fund the salaries, pensions or benefits of any board members, administrator, and/or teachers or for other school operating expenses.

If Measure E is approved, the Board of the District will appoint a citizens’ oversight committee, and conduct annual independent financial and performance audits to ensure that bond funds are spent only on the construction, modernization, and renovation of school facilities, furnishings and/or equipment, or the acquisition or lease of property for school facilities, and for no other purposes.

An ad valorem tax would be levied and collected on property within the boundaries of the District to pay the principal and interest on the Bonds. The best estimate of the average annual tax rate at this time is approximately $0.04 per $100 per assessment (or $41.99 per $100,000) of assessed value. The final year in which the tax is anticipated to be collected is 2050-2051.

The Resolution provides that the maximum interest rate on the Bonds will not exceed the maximum statutory interest and the maximum term of the Bonds, or any series thereof, will not exceed the maximum statutory term. The best estimate of the total debt service, including the principal and interest, that would be required to be repaid if all of the bonds are issued and sold is $315,000,000.

Approval of Measure E does not guarantee that the proposed projects in the District, that are the subject of the Bonds under Measure E, will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by Measure E. The District’s proposal for the project or projects the receipt of matching state funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure.

For this Measure to be approved fifty-five percent (55%) of qualified voters who vote on the Measure must vote yes.

A “YES” vote on Measure “E” is a vote to allow the District to sell the Bonds and levy the necessary taxes to pay for the Bonds.

A “NO” vote on Measure “E” is a vote against allowing the District to sell the Bonds and levy the necessary taxes to pay for the Bonds.

By:           Ronak N. Patel, Deputy County Counsel

Tax rate

https://www.voteinfo.net/

An election will be held in Jurupa Unified School District (the “District”) on March 3, 2020, for the purpose of submitting to the electors of the District the question of incurring a bonded indebtedness of the District in the principal amount of $192,000,000. If such bonds are authorized and sold, the principal thereof and interest thereon will be payable from the proceeds of taxes levied on the taxable property in the District. The following information regarding tax rates is given in compliance with Section 9401 of the California Elections Code. This information is based upon the best estimates and projections presently available from official sources, upon experience within the District and other demonstrable factors.

Based upon the foregoing and projections of the assessed valuations of taxable property in the District, and assuming the entire debt service on the bonds will be paid through property taxation:

1.   The best estimate from official sources of the average annual tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue over the entire duration of the bond debt service, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of the filing of this statement, or on a projection based on experience within the District or other demonstrable factors, is 41.99 cents per $100 ($41.99 per $100,000) of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed. The final year in which the tax is anticipated to be collected is 2050-51.

2.   The best estimate from official sources of the highest tax rate that would be required to be levied to fund the bond issue and an estimate of the year in which that rate will apply, based on estimated assessed valuations available at the time of the filing of this statement, is 41.99 cents per $100 ($41.99 per $100,000) of assessed valuation of all property to be taxed and the year 2047-48.

3.   The best estimate from official sources of the total debt service, including the principal and interest that would be required to be repaid if all the bonds are issued and sold, is $315 million.

Attention of voters is directed to the fact that the foregoing information is based upon projections and estimates. The actual timing of sales of the bonds and the amount to be sold at any time will be governed by the needs of the District and other factors. The actual interest rates at which the bonds will be sold, which will not exceed the maximum permitted by law, will depend upon the bond market at the time of sale. The actual assessed valuations in future years will depend upon the value of property within the District as determined in the assessment and the equalization process. Assessed valuation is not the same as market price of real property. Therefore, the actual tax rates and the years in which those tax rates will be applicable may vary from those presently estimated and stated above.

By:     Elliott Duchon, Superintendent
Jurupa Unified School District

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Argumento A FAVOR

Vote YES on Measure E to improve the quality of education in Jurupa schools by ensuring all students have equal access to the classrooms, labs and facilities they need to succeed.

Every penny of Measure E stays right here in Jurupa to repair and upgrade our local schools and cannot be taken by the State.

Voting YES on Measure E improves campus security by updating security fencing and cameras, emergency communication systems, centralized lockdown systems, smoke detectors, fire alarms and sprinklers. Only a few schools have modern safety and security features, meaning the majority of our schools still need critical upgrades to keep our students safe.

Measure E is a fiscally accountable plan that ensures students in older schools have the same opportunities as those in newer schools – so all students receive the quality education and career training they need to be prepared for college and good jobs.

Our community needs Measure E to improve our music, arts and athletic facilities, as studies show kids participating in these activities are less likely to get involved in drugs, gangs and crime.

Vote YES on E:

l Remove hazardous materials like asbestos and lead paint from older schools

l Repair deteriorating roofs, plumbing, sewer lines, electrical systems and wood beams with extensive termite damage

l Provide the classrooms and technology needed to support high-quality instruction in science, technology, engineering and math

l Improve student safety and campus security systems

l Modernize labs and career training classrooms to prepare students for in-demand careers in fields like health, engineering, technology and skilled trades.

Every Penny of Measure E Stays Local

l No Measure E funds can be taken by the State

l A Citizens’ Oversight Committee and independent audits are required

l By law, no money can be used for administrators’ salaries or benefits

Join us – vote YES on Measure E!

By:           Robert Garcia

Carl Harris

Benita B. Roberts
Anthony Kelly, Jr.
Diane Frank

— https://www.voteinfo.net/

Argumento EN CONTRA

Vote NO on more school bond debt. Vote NO on a blank check for our school district.

If your house has an assessed value of $300,000, you are already paying almost $300 for school bonds. This bond adds another $126.

In 2014, voters approved a $144 million school bond for, among other things, the safety and security of our students and career and vocational training facilities. Yet voters got:

-One school with security cameras and window safety tinting at two schools. Didn’t we expect more?

-A welding lab at Nueva Vista High, a welding simulator at Jurupa Valley High, and a video studio at Rubidoux High. Patriot High got nothing. Didn’t we expect more?

What was the money used for? Five schools got or will get brand new staff office buildings. New staff offices – we certainly didn’t expect that!

JUSD has not published a list of projects they plan on spending $192 million of our tax dollars for. Why the secrecy? Voters deserve to know if they are voting for improvements for children’s education and safety or new staff offices.

There is no data that the last bond improved the education of students. Bond money can’t be used for teacher training, establishing professional learning communities, staff collaboration, teaming with researchers, or other proven ways to improve education.

JUSD says if voters “care about kids” we will vote for another bond. Yet JUSD did not care enough to spread the 2014 bond money equitably among the children of JUSD. Most students still go to schools without the promised safety measures or career training facilities.

If we care about children, we will not give them additional bond debt they will be paying off until today’s kindergartners have kindergartners of their own.

By:           Wendy Mello Beebe
Niall Westerfield

— https://www.voteinfo.net/

Refutación al argumento A FAVOR

In 2014, we passed a $144 million school bond. At that time the voters were told the money would be spent on safety and security, career and technical training facilities, science labs, and removal of lead paint and asbestos. Now we are being asked for $192 million for THE EXACT SAME THINGS!

Our school district didn’t give us what they promised last time, so why do you think they will this time? How many times does JUSD expect us to pass a bond for things they never do?

Just like with the last bond, when we got new staff offices instead of security systems, it is clear the school district will build new facilities with this bond money. Mailers and talks to local groups emphasize art, music, and sports facilities and replacing existing libraries and multipurpose rooms.

JUSD says they used the last bond money to replace AC units and repair sports tracks. That is normal maintenance JUSD should be budgeting for. If JUSD has no money to maintain what they have, where will the money come from to maintain new facilities?

Our children deserve 100% of all bond money to go to their education and their safety, not fancy new facilities that only a small percentage of students will use.

We have to let our school board know we won’t give them another blank check.

The only way to tell them that is by VOTING NO on MEASURE E.

By:           Zachary Everhart
Mary G Anderson

— https://www.voteinfo.net/

Refutación al argumento EN CONTRA

 

Don't be misled.

As local leaders who believe that strong schools are essential for our community, we make it a priority to know the facts. We’re voting YES on E.

l  Measure E is accountable. Independent citizens’ oversight and mandatory audits ensure all funds stay local to make the critical safety upgrades and facilities repairs our schools need.

l  Jurupa Unified School District has a proven track record of excellent fiscal management of past bond measures. Past measures were never promised or intended to address every need in the District. You can see every penny was spent responsibly in the oversight reports: https://jurupausd.org/our-district/planning/Pages/COC.aspx

l  Not only did our past measure touch every school in the District, but every student benefitted from the technology updates.

l  Providing Jurupa students with equal access to updated classrooms and labs is Measure E’s top priority. It is essential to ensuring students in older schools have the same learning opportunities as those in newer schools.

l  The State doesn’t fund facilities improvements. In fact, passing Measure E is the only way to help us qualify for state matching funds.

l  Measure E is an investment in our students’ futures and our community. Measure E costs the typical homeowner less than $10 per month to provide the safe and modern schools students need to be prepared for college and careers.

We are parents, business owners and education leaders, and we are taxpayers too. We are accountable; to our kids, to our community and to ensuring quality education for all Jurupa students.

Vote YES on E.

By:           Betty Folsom, Resident, 49 years and JCSD Board Vice President

Richard Leach, High School Automotive Technology Teacher and former Classified Staff Member

Nicole Prieto, Local Business Owner and Parent

David H. Barnes, Veteran and Local Business

Sheryl Schmidt, Citizens’ Oversight Committee Member

 

— https://www.voteinfo.net/

Leer la legislación propuesta

Legislación propuesta

FULL TEXT BALLOT PROPOSITION

OF THE JURUPA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

BOND MEASURE ELECTION FOR MARCH 3, 2020

“To repair deteriorating roofs/plumbing/electrical systems; update classrooms/labs/facilities/technology to support college readiness/career preparation in math, science, engineering, technology, arts/skilled trades; upgrade older schools to meet the same academic/safety standards as newer schools, and improve student safety; shall the Jurupa Unified School District measure authorizing $192,000,000 in bonds at legal rates be adopted, levying 4¢ per $100 assessed value ($10,800,000 annually) while bonds are outstanding, with citizen oversight, independent audits, local control?”

PROJECT LIST

The Board of Education of the Jurupa Unified School District certifies that it has evaluated the District’s urgent and critical school needs, including school and student safety issues, enrollment trends, class size reduction, overcrowding, energy efficiency and computer technology, seismic safety requirements, and aging, outdated or deteriorating school buildings in developing the scope of projects to be funded. The Board of Education will prioritize the key health and safety and sustainability needs so that the most critical school site needs are addressed. The District conducted an evaluation at all school sites and received public input in developing the scope of school projects to be funded. In approving this Project List, the Board of Education determines that the District should:

(i)          Upgrade safety and security systems

(ii)         Provide career technical classrooms, facilities and labs for job training to prepare students for the workforce.

(iii)       Upgrade classrooms and labs to support the core academics of math, science, reading and writing.

(iv)       Renovate and repair buildings, classrooms, fields and playground areas.

(v)        Acquire sites, as necessary, and construct new classrooms and school facilities to accommodate enrollment growth.

(vi)       Adhere to specific FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY safeguards such as these:

(a)        Sacramento will be prohibited from taking any of the funds raised.

(b)        All expenditures will be subject to annual independent financial and performance audits.

(c)        No funds will be used for administrators’ salaries and pensions.

(d)        All funds will be subject to local control and provide improvements at all of our schools.

(e)        An independent citizens’ oversight committee will be appointed to ensure that all funds are spent only as authorized.

The Project List includes the following types of projects:

Neighborhood School Renovation, Repair and Upgrade Projects

Goal and Purpose: Schools will benefit from the renovation, repair, upgrade, furnishing and equipment of deteriorating, outdated school buildings, science labs, classrooms, computer learning centers and school libraries and athletic and fine arts facilities, in order to ensure compliance with handicap accessibility requirements and that students and teachers have the resources they need to excel and students are prepared for college and careers when they graduate, by undertaking the following:

·            Upgrade, furnish and equip classrooms, STEAM labs, English labs, science labs and multipurpose rooms and facilities.

·            Provide improved, upgraded computer labs.

·            Replace and add electrical service capacity to relieve currently overloaded electrical systems.

·            Repair, upgrade and replace roofs, as needed.

·            Comply with Federal and State-mandated Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) handicap accessibility requirements.

School Health, Safety and Security, and Earthquake Safety Projects

·            Install new security systems, such as security (surveillance) cameras, outdoor lighting, fencing, gates and classroom door locks.

·            Remove or abate asbestos, lead paint, mold and other hazardous materials.

·            Upgrade emergency communication systems.

·            Upgrade fire alarm systems to automatic systems, repair and replace fire safety equipment, add sprinklers and fire safety doors.

·            Upgrades to schools in order to meet handicap accessibility requirements.

·           Replace/upgrade existing signage, bells and clocks.

·           Upgrade and replace playground equipment and athletic fields to meet current safety standards.

Energy Efficiency Projects — Returning Savings to the Classrooms.

·           Replace older heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems with energy-efficient systems for cost savings and energy efficiency.

·           Replace existing window systems with energy-efficient systems.

·           Replace older ceilings and lighting systems with building code-compliant, energy -efficient systems.

District-Wide Wiring and Instructional Technology
For Effective Learning Environment Projects

·           Update computer labs.

·           Provide and maintain upgraded technology, data and communication equipment.

·           Upgrade and expand wireless systems, telecommunications and internet access.

·           Upgrade and replace computers, hardware and software systems.

·           Upgrade and replace classroom furniture, equipment and instructional aids.

·           Upgrade media and audio/visual equipment.

·           Expand bandwidth to allow students greater access to the Internet.

Listed building, repair and rehabilitation projects and upgrades may be completed as needed. Each project is assumed to include its share of furniture, equipment, architectural, engineering, and similar planning costs, program/project management, staff training expenses and a customary contingency for unforeseen design and construction costs. In addition to the Projects stated above, proceeds from the sale of bonds will also be used for payment of facility-related construction costs, the acquisition of land, the payment of the costs of preparation of all facility planning, facility assessment reviews, facility master plan updates, environmental studies (including environmental investigation, remediation and monitoring) and construction documentation, the acquisition or prepayment of outstanding ground leases, acquiring and leasing of real property for school facilities, including the purchase of leased facilities and the refinancing of outstanding lease obligations, including, but not limited to, the refinancing of existing lease obligations of the District, acquiring and leasing of property for temporary housing of dislocated District activities caused by bond-financed Projects and the leasing or acquisition of staff parking or a transportation lot for school buses. The upgrading of technology infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, computers, LCD projectors, portable interface devices, servers, switches, routers, modules, sound projection, card access systems, laser printers, digital white boards, document projectors, upgraded voice-over IP, call manager and network security/firewall, and other miscellaneous equipment and software.

In addition to the projects listed above, the repair and renovation of each of the existing school facilities may include, but not be limited to, some or all of the following: renovation of student and staff restrooms; repair and replacement of heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems; upgrade of facilities for energy efficiency and to reduce fire risks; repair and replacement of worn-out and leaky roofs, windows, walls, doors and drinking fountains; demolition of unsafe school facilities; installation of wiring and electrical systems to safely accommodate computers, technology and other electrical devices and needs; repairing and replacing fire alarms, emergency communications and security systems; resurfacing or replacing of hard courts, turf and irrigation systems and campus landscaping; building new and/or renovating existing gymnasiums, pools and high school stadiums; upgrading or replacing inadequate libraries, multi-purpose rooms, kitchens and administrative spaces; upgrading locker rooms; installing lunch shelters, artificial turf, and bleachers; improving sanitation and recycling; expanding parking; building a new stadium; installing interior and exterior painting and floor covering; replacing portable classrooms; installing covered walkways or shelters; adding administrative support spaces; upgrading school site kitchens; repairing rubberized play apparatus surfaces; demolition; and construction of various forms of storage and support spaces; upgrading classrooms; repairing, upgrading and installing interior and exterior lighting systems; replacing water and sewer lines and other plumbing systems; and replacing outdated security fences and security systems.

The allocation of bond proceeds will be affected by the District’s receipt of State matching funds and the final costs of each Project. Approval of Measure E does not guarantee that the proposed Project or Projects within the District that are the subject of bonds under Measure E will be funded beyond the local revenues generated by Measure E. The District’s proposal for the project or projects may assume the receipt of matching state funds, which could be subject to appropriation by the Legislature or approval of a statewide bond measure. In the absence of State matching funds, which the District will aggressively pursue to reduce the District’s share of the costs of the Projects, the District may not be able to complete some of the Projects listed above. 

The final cost of each project will be determined as plans are finalized, construction bids are awarded and projects are completed. Based on the final costs of each project, certain projects described above may be delayed or may not be completed. Demolition of existing facilities and reconstruction of facilities scheduled for repair and upgrade may occur, if the Board determines that such an approach would be more cost-effective in creating more enhanced and operationally efficient campuses. Necessary site preparation/restoration may occur in connection with new construction, renovation or remodeling, or installation or removal of relocatable classrooms, including ingress and egress, removing, replacing or installing irrigation, storm drain, and utility lines, trees and landscaping, relocating fire access roads, and acquiring any necessary easements, licenses, or rights of way to the property. Proceeds of the bonds may be used to pay or reimburse the District for the costs of District staff when performing work on or necessary and incidental to bond projects. Bond proceeds shall only be expended for the specific purposes identified herein. 

As required by the California Constitution, the proceeds from the sale of the bonds will be used only for the provision of school facilities by construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, refinancing or replacement of school facilities, including the furnishing and equipping of school facilities, or the acquisition or lease or real property for school facilities, and not for any other purpose, including teacher and administrator salaries and other school operating expenses.  

The District will conduct an annual, independent performance audit to ensure that the funds have been expended only on projects included in the Project List set forth above.

The District will conduct an annual, independent financial audit of the proceeds from the sale of the bonds until all of those proceeds have been expended on projects included in the Project List set forth above.

Pursuant to Section 15772 of the Education Code, the Board will appoint a citizens’ oversight committee and conduct annual independent audits to assure that bond proceeds are spent only on projects included in the Project List set forth above and for no other purposes.

NO ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES. PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THE BONDS AUTHORIZED BY THIS PROPOSITION SHALL BE USED ONLY FOR THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, RECONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OR REPLACEMENT OF SCHOOL FACILITIES, INCLUDING THE FURNISHING AND EQUIPPING OF FACILITIES, AND NOT FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE, INCLUDING PENSIONS, TEACHER AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR SALARIES AND OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES. 

FISCAL ACCOUNTABILITY. THE EXPENDITURE OF BOND MONEY ON THESE PROJECTS IS SUBJECT TO STRINGENT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS. BY LAW, PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS WILL BE PERFORMED ANNUALLY, AND ALL BOND EXPENDITURES WILL BE MONITORED BY AN INDEPENDENT CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE (EDUCATION CODE SECTION 15278 ET SEQ.) TO ENSURE THAT FUNDS ARE SPENT AS PROMISED AND SPECIFIED. THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MUST INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, REPRESENTATIVES OF A BONA FIDE TAXPAYERS ASSOCIATION, A BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND A SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION. NO DISTRICT EMPLOYEES OR VENDORS ARE ALLOWED TO SERVE ON THE CITIZENS’ OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE.

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